Archive: ‘Rwanda’



New Book Review: Mobilizing Transnational Gender Politics in Post-Genocide Rwanda by Rirhandu Mageza-Barthel

Wednesday, April 12th, 2017

The Journal of Modern African Studies has just published my latest book review on Rirhandu Mageza-Barthel’s Mobilizing Transational Gender Politics in Post-Genocide Rwanda. This book is essential reading for those individuals who are interested in gender equality practices and policies in Rwanda. It offers a nuanced middle-ground between popular media accounts that celebrate the nation for its impressive inclusion of women in politics–most notably, the fact that 64% of seats in Rwanda’s parliament are curently held by women making it a world leader on women’s representation in domestic politics–and academic accounts that warn that while Rwandan women elites are making notable progress, rural Rwandan women still face significant challenges in their everyday lives. Mageza-Barthel does this by bringing interviews with women political activists who were intimately involved in high-level negotiations with the international community and the Rwandan government into conversation with important shifts in international and domestic policies aimed at promoting gender equality. In the process, her analysis tells us much, not only about how integral these political actors were for influencing Rwanda’s current gender equality policies, but also how they were able to impact present-day norms supported by the United Nations and other international institutions, successfully challenging ‘women’s invisibility in theories of how politics is done’ (p.17).

 

 

Keynote presentation: “Beyond victims and perpetrators: Complex political actors surrounding the 1994 genocide in Rwanda”

Thursday, October 27th, 2016

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Last week, I had the pleasure of attending the University of Marburg Centre for Conflict Studies conference “On Collective Violence: Actions, Roles, Perceptions.” It included three jam-packed days of presentations by scholars and practitioners approaching the study of collective violence in different settings from a range of (inter)disciplinary backgrounds. In addition to being expertly organized by Kristine Avram, Melanie Hartmann, Miriam Leiberich, Philipp Schultheiß, and Timothy Williams, the overall format of the event resulted in many excellent papers and fruitful conversations between those in attendance. (more…)

New Publication: ‘Rwandan Women No More: Female Génocidaires in the Aftermath of the 1994 Rwandan Genocide’ in Conflict and Society

Monday, December 14th, 2015

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I’m pleased to announce my article, ‘Rwandan Women No More: Female Génocidaires in the Aftermath of the 1994 Rwandan Genocide‘ has just been published in the new anthropology journal, Conflict and Society: Advances in Research. Part of a special section that explores the ethical, methodological, and theoretical insights that can be gained from applying ethnographic methods to the study of perpetrators of political violence, this article examines Rwanda’s admittedly dynamic gender norms as they pertain to the alleged criminal activities of Rwandan women during the 1994 genocide. (more…)

New Book Review: Susan Thomson’s “Whispering Truth to Power”

Monday, January 5th, 2015

Adobe Photoshop PDFThe fall 2014 issue of the African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review has just been released, and includes my review of Susan Thomson’s Whispering Truth to Power: Everyday Resistance to Reconciliation in Post-Genocide Rwanda. In brief, Thomson has written a rich, ethnographically informed book that offers valuable insights on how the current government’s program of national unity and reconciliation impacts the everyday lives of its rural citizens, with particular attention paid to the subtle but meaningful acts of resistance engaged in by rural Rwandans. As such, she complicates the claims of both the Rwandan government and the international community that the Rwandan government’s program of national unity and reconciliation is affecting positive change in Rwanda, and provides a relevant foundation for further studies of grassroots resistance in other conflict and post-conflict settings. Similarly, it represents a powerful indictment of those regional and international experts who would dismiss the Rwandan government’s poor human rights record in the region given the nation’s remarkable economic progress. (more…)

PART II OF ORAL HISTORY REVIEW EXCHANGE ON “STORYTELLING IN ORAL HISTORY NOW ONLINE

Friday, May 23rd, 2014

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The Oral History Review blog has recently published the second part of an email exchange Alex Freund and I had surrounding the publication of his new article “Confessing Animals”: Toward a Longue Durée History of the Oral History Interview.” In it, we discuss the troubling tendency for many oral history practitioners to, following the stated benefits of narrative therapy, claim that the interview experience is inherently cathartic and healing for interviewees. To read part two of the exchange, visit: Storytelling in Oral History: An Exchange, Part 2.

 

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